Food corner

"Like all foods, bread is a nexus of economic, political, aesthetic, social, symbolic, and health concerns. As traditionally the most important food in the Sardinian diet, bread is a particularly sensitive indicator of change."

Carole M Counihan

Twitter feed
Aleppo pepper Alicante all spice almond anchovy apple apricot Argentina artichokes asparagus aubergine autumn bacon banana basil beef beetroot berry biscuit bistro bloggers Bolivia bread breadcrumbs British budget Buenos Aires bulgar wheat butter cafe cake capers caraway cardamom carrot cauliflower chard cheese chick peas chicken chicory chilli chocolate chorizo Christmas cinnamon clams cloves cobnut cocoa coconut cooking class Copenhagen Córdoba coriander cornflakes courgette flowers crayfish cream cream cheese creme fraiche cucumber culinary catastrophe cumin Dalmatia delivery dill dips Dubrovnik Easter easy Edinburgh egg eggplant fennel feta fettuccine ffine bean filo fine dining Finsbury Park fish fish sauce five spice flour food anthropology French game garlic gastropub gherkin ginger gluten free goat's cheese golden syrup greengage Guinness halloumi ham harissa hazelnut hibiscus honey horseradish Islington Istanbul Italian jam Japanese Kent ketchup Korean lamb leek lemon lemongrass lentils lime London loquat Madrid market mascarpone Mayfair Mendoza milk mint mirin morcilla mozzarella mushroom mussels mustard Nahm Natoora Nepalese New Zealand noras oats olive olive oil onion orange Oxfordshire paprika Paris Parmesan parsley party pastry peanut pear peas pepper Peru pickle pine nuts pizza pomegranate pop-ups pork potato prawn preserved lemon prosciutto Provence providore Puerto Iguazú pulse pumpkin quail egg quick radish ras el hanout raspberries red pepper paste restaurant ribs ricotta rocket rosemary runner bean saffron sage sausage shallot smoked mackerel smoked salmon sorrel soy spaghetti spinach spring squid stilton stock street food sugar sumac summer supper club Sydney syrup Tabasco tagliatelle tahini take away tamarind tarragon tart Thai thyme tom yum paste tomato tomato paste tuna Turkey versatile Vietnamese vinegar walnut water chestnut white pepper wine yoghurt

Entries in cucumber (4)


Middle Eastern mezze no.7: Fattoush

For those of you who haven’t heard of this delicious salad, Wikipedia offers a detailed explanation:

Fattoush is a Levantine bread salad made from toasted or fried pieces of pita bread (khubz 'arabi) combined with mixed greens and other vegetables ... To make fattoush, cooks use seasonal produce, mixing different vegetables and herbs according to taste, while making use of pitas that have gone stale ... Sumac is usually used to give fattoush its sour taste.

As you can gather this is not an easy dish to write a recipe for since the only constant ingredient is bread, and even with that there is a choice, albeit an obvious one. Toasted stale bread versus crispy, crunchy, shards of golden goodness; you know which gets my vote. 

Click to read more ...


Middle Eastern mezze no.5: Tzatziki

Yes, I know, tzatziki is Greek, and Greece is not technically Middle Eastern, but the Turkish word cacik (apart from looking like it reads ‘cat sick’) would be likely to return blank stares from most of my English speaking readership.

Tzatziki and cacik share the same core ingredients – yoghurt, cucumber, garlic, olive oil and salt. However, strictly speaking, they are not quite the same. Tzatziki is always of a thick consistency, while cacik is sometimes diluted with water and served as a soup. Tzatziki is usually flavoured with lemon juice, while cacik would use lime. Both can be flavoured with dill or mint, but only tzatziki occasionally contains parsley, while sumac or ground paprika are sometimes used to season cacik.

Here I give a recipe for a basic tzatziki. I tend to go with the less is more approach because I usually serve it with a selection of mezze dishes – tabbouli, hummous, spicy lamb mince, falafel – where the other herbs and spices make separate appearances. Nonetheless, I encourage you to play around with some of the above ingredients to make it your own, particularly if you are serving it as a standalone dip.

Click to read more ...


Guest post: Chef Has (my Dad) shares his recipe for raita

As some of you may know, I owe most of my cookery skills, understanding of and passion for food to my Dad. I have asked him to share some of his infinite culinary knowledge with you by doing some guest posts every now and then.

This first post comes about largely by chance. Having seen my post on Kolhapuri lamb, which included a haphazard attempt at a recipe for raita, he sent me an email yesterday with the recipe he uses; I now know why his raita always tastes so much better than mine! I asked him to turn it into a post and also to explain one of the canapés from Christmas Eve, pictured above. The beauty of this canapé is that it look really impressive and tastes great, but is really easy. I hope this will be the first of many posts from Dad, or as he will henceforth be known, Hash Brown.

Click to read more ...


Claudia's pomegranate and feta salad with mint and coriander

If you looked at the post I did yesterday showing the many delicious things I ate over Christmas, you may be surprised that the first recipe I am choosing to share is a humble salad. In reality it was far from humble; elegant, vibrant and sophisticated, for me it was the star of the show.

The salad is a wonderful balance flavours and textures. The casing of the pomegranate seeds, firm and crisp, give way to a plump, juicy centre, slightly tart in flavour. Cucumber adds extra crunch, contrasting with the soft, crumbly feta. The salty cheese also brings in the necessary savoury element, supported by the red onion, sumac and red wine vinaigrette. Coriander and mint are the final touches in this unrestrainedly refreshing summer salad.

Click to read more ...